11-year-old schoolgirl scores highest possible mark on Mensa IQ test

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An 11-year-old girl who memorized the entire periodic table in 40 minutes scored the highest possible score on the Mensa IQ test, making her brighter than Einstein.

Anushka Dixit scored 162 points, which means she is well above the “genius” score of 140 and two points more than Stephen Hawking.

Her mother Arti, 45, said her only child had always been bright and started speaking when she was just six months old, copying words from TV commercials.

Anushka Dixit (pictured) scored 162 points, meaning she is well above the “genius” score of 140 and two points more than Stephen Hawking

Her mother Arti, 45 (pictured left) said her only child had always been bright and started speaking when she was just six months old, copying words from TV commercials

Her mother Arti, 45 (pictured left) said her only child had always been bright and started speaking when she was just six months old, copying words from TV commercials

Book smart: Despite being the youngest person on the exam - around three decades - she scored the highest, placing her in the top 1% in the world in terms of intelligence

Book smart: Despite being the youngest person on the exam – around three decades – she scored the highest, placing her in the top 1% in the world in terms of intelligence

She begged her mom to let her take the Mensa IQ tests because she was looking for a new challenge after passing all 11+ exams with flying colors.

And despite being the youngest person on the exam – around three decades – she scored the highest, placing her in the top 1% in the world in terms of intelligence.

Anushka, from Barkingside, London, said: “It wasn’t very difficult, just a little difficult.

“It was only the time pressure that was difficult. One part was 28 questions in four minutes.

What is Mensa? And how to join?

Mensa was founded in England in 1946 by Roland Berrill, lawyer and Dr Lance Ware, scientist and lawyer.

According to the organization, Mensa is a company for bright, like-minded people.

Its objectives are:

  • offer a stimulating intellectual and social environment to its members
  • identify and promote human intelligence for the benefit of humanity
  • encourage research into the nature, characteristics and uses of intelligence

To become a Mensa member, you must prove that your IQ is among the richest two percent of the population.

Anyone over the age of ten and a half can take the Mensa supervised IQ test.

As the organization is a “round table” society, all members are considered equal and there is no separate part of the organization for gifted youth.

Source: Mensa

“It just boosted my self-confidence after passing 11+ and made me want to take the Mensa test.

“I got all the notes. I was really, really shocked by this. I started crying after the test ended because I thought maybe I misunderstood one of the nonverbal questions.

“I was aiming for 162 but I was still shocked.”

Arti said her daughter started speaking when she was six months old and was already learning country capitals at the age of one, with help from her mother.

She knew how to read and write in the reception class, and told her teachers during her first year of school that she wanted to be prime minister one day.

Anushka was tested on April 20 at the University of East London and her mother said she was surrounded by people in their 30s, 40s, 50s and 60s.

With the score Anushka received, she now qualifies to become a member of Mensa, also known as the High IQ Society.

She received the results by mail at home where she lives with her mother Arti, a housewife, and her father Neeraj, 48, a police officer.

“My favorite subject is English and I love poetry,” said Anushka, who is an avid dancer.

“When I grow up, I would like to become a doctor.

“If that doesn’t happen, I have other professions that I would like to have, for example I could go into finance. I love maths.

IQ of famous people

Albert Einstein (scientist) – 160

Marie Curie (physicist and chemist) – 185

Nikola Tesla (inventor) – between 160 and 310

Sofia Kovalevskaya (mathematician) – 170

Stephen Hawking (scientist) – 160

Mary Shelley (philosopher and novelist) – 175

“I like all subjects. There is no subject in school that I don’t like.

“I memorized the periodic table. There was no real reason. I was just testing what my memory looked like.

Arti was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2017 and underwent surgery in 2018, and said the ordeal deeply affected her daughter.

She said she was proud of her determination to pass the Mensa test, despite her struggles to cope with her mother’s treatment.

Arti said, “Despite my treatment for breast cancer, her continued zeal and determination always forced her to go the extra mile.

“Even though she sobbed endlessly during my lumpectomy, in the back of her mind she was desperate for success or happiness.”


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